After Six-Year’s Self-Imposed Isolation, Kim Jong Un To Show Negotiation Tactics

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New Delhi: After six years of self-imposed isolation from the world, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has demonstrated a surprisingly well stocked toolbox of negotiating tactics in high-stakes summits with the presidents of South Korea and China over the past two months.

What might he try out in Tuesday's summit with President Donald Trump?

Here's a quick playbook of some of the tactics Kim might be expected to lean on and how they might play out when he sits down for his highest-stakes meeting yet.

Kim wasted no time in unleashing this one on South Korean President Moon Jae-inwhen they met for the first time two months ago in the Demilitarized Zone that divides their two countries.

After the two shook hands across the dividing line and Kim stepped across into the South, as scripted, he took Moon's hand and walked him back over the line and into the North. The seemingly simple, impromptu act was filled with symbolism and widely welcomed in the South as a sign of his desire for Korean unity.

Kim also wowed the South Koreans with his seemingly unexpected willingness to sit and have a leisurely chat with Moon as the two took a stroll through the DMZ.

His meetings with Chinese President Xi Jinping, meanwhile, had a strong element of surprise to them as well, at least to the outside world. Trump has suggested even he didn't know ahead of time about the second one, and expressed frustration over whether Xi might have tried to use that meeting to throw a monkey wrench into the Singapore meeting.

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